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FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions
History Undergraduate Program

  1. How do I declare a History major?
    • If you are already in the College of Arts & Sciences, visit 213 Life Sciences East to fill out the necessary paperwork. 
    • If you are in a different college, fill out the Undergraduate Academic Program Declaration Form, contacting your original college's student services center for "Originating College Signature" and Arts & Sciences 213 Life Sciences East for "Approval signature from College." 
  2. How do I declare a History minor?
    • Visit 213 Life Sciences East to fill out the necessary paperwork. If you need to discuss classes, contact Dr. Zeide: zeide@okstate.edu 
  3. How do I make an appointment with Dr. Zeide? 
    •  See the full appointment calendar on STAR star.okstate.edu. If you can't access STAR for some reason, then email Dr. Zeide zeide@okstate.edu with blocks of time you have free in the coming days, and she will reply with an appointment time. 
  4. How do I keep track of what courses I need to take?
    • Your degree check sheet should be on the Reports tab in STAR. If not, contact Dr. Zeide for an updated check sheet. 
  5. How do I search for courses?
    • Go to Self-Service at my.okstate.edu. Select “Registration and Planning” in the Student Profile, then “Browse Classes,” and choose the desired term from the drop-down menu. Click “Advanced Search” for expanded search options, such as: Day/time meeting combination; Subject; Course attribute (general education, etc.); Course level (undergraduate, graduate, etc.); Instructional method (Online, Traditional, etc.); Campus.
  6. How do I find short courses that are offered at unusual times, or for less than standard credits?
    • Visit the Registrar's page: https://registrar.okstate.edu/SIO-Schedule and download the relevant semester's spreadsheet. Once you've downloaded the spreadsheet, you can use the Sort feature in Excel to sort by start date (to find courses that haven't yet begun), number of credits, or any other parameters.
  7. How do I drop a course? Do I need to meet with my advisor? 
    • See all the policy details here. If the drop deadline has not passed, you can just typically drop a course yourself on Banner. Try that first. If it doesn't work, you'll need to fill out a drop/add card, and get the relevant signatures before taking it to the Registrar's office. 

 

Undergraduate Handbook

Download the full undergraduate handbook here, or see links to parts of it below: 

Why Study History? (an essay by Peter Stearns, American Historical Association)
History Minor (PDF Flyer)
Proposed Four-Year Degree Plan, 2017-18
Enrollment Advising Form
Career Paths for History Majors
What to do with a Degree in History (PDF)

Enrollment AdvisingSee all the information about enrolling here: https://registrar.okstate.edu/Registration-and-Enrollment

  • Plan Ahead. Ahead of meeting with your advisor before your enrollment date, review your degree sheet and all the requirements of your major. Use this, along with the course listings online, to prepare a proposed schedule with specific courses for next semester. For students who have completed 90 hours, you can download your most recent Grad Check and Degree Sheets via STAR star.okstate.edu (under Reports).
    • From the Student Self-Service page on Banner, you can check for holds, check your enrollment date, view general education courses, and view available courses and times. This is also where you’ll officially register after your advising meeting.
    • Fill out a proposed Enrollment Advising Form before coming to your advising meeting.
  • Schedule Your Appointment. You should meet with your advisor in the weeks before your enrollment date, making an appointment via STAR star.okstate.edu.
    • Make note of the purpose of our meeting in the STAR notes: indicate “enrollment.”
    • Schedule these meetings as far in advance as possible.
    • If you cannot make your appointment, cancel via STAR as soon as possible, so that another student may be able to take your spot. If you are late to your appointment, you may be asked to reschedule.
    • If you are unable to meet in person for any reason, please email me to arrange an alternate means by which we can touch base to confirm your schedule and lift your registration hold.

History Club. History Club is more than just a fun student organization—it is a way to become a real part of the History Department community. Events are usually held 2-3 times a month. Check the website for the up to date schedule: http://history.okstate.edu/academics/history-clubBecoming involved in History Club has many benefits:

  • A chance to get to know other History majors and to build relationships that will strengthen your academic and social lives.
  • An opportunity to interact with faculty outside of class, getting to know them as real people and not just intimidating figures in front of the classroom (also comes in handy when soliciting recommendation letters).
  • The chance to develop leadership and planning experience.
  • Access to lots of fun events, ranging from historical trivia night to guest speakers, from career preparation events to movie nights, from field trips to study nights. And lots of free food!
  • A space to get to work more closely with the undergraduate advisor.

Undergraduate Office Space
    In response to student demand, we have created a space within the History department for dedicated undergraduate office space, to be used as a regular place to work on campus, a place to stash your books, and a place to interact with other History majors. The big office at the end of the north hallway, S. Murray Rm. 122, houses 11 cubicles, each with a desk, computer, and shelf, and a printer for the whole office. The department will call for applications for these desks before each semester begins, and at least 1 desk will remain open for drop-in use, to be open to all History majors during work hours. Students assigned a desk will be given keys to the building and the office, to be used at any time. Some tips to keep in mind for students interacting in the shared workspace, given that it's often hard to balance social interaction with the quiet space many need to really focus on their work:

  • If there are others in the office, keep your conversations to a minimum.
  • Try to read others' body language to pick up on whether they are trying to have quiet work time.
  • Take extended conversations, in person or on phone, away from the work area.
  • If you listen to music while you work, do so with headphones or ear buds.
  • Ask whether someone is busy before approaching for a conversation.
  • Be respectful, flexible, and honest. Respectfully express your situation to others (“I don’t mean to be rude, but I’m  trying to meet my deadline; could you take the conversation to the hallway?”). Be kind.

Master of Arts Program

I.  ADMISSION
 
A.  In addition to fulfillment of the general requirements of the Graduate College, admission to the Master of Arts program in history shall be based upon the recommendation of the Graduate Studies Committee to the Head of the department.
 
B. The preferred background for admission is an undergraduate major in history.  The Graduate Studies Committee will consider other applications on an individual basis.  Students with insufficient undergraduate hours in history may be required by the Graduate Studies Committee to take additional hours at the 5000/6000 level.  Students applying to Plan I are expected to have made progress toward proficiency in a foreign language before seeking admission.
 
C. The Graduate Studies Committee will give preference to applicants with an overall grade point average of 3.0 or above and a grade point average of 3.5 or above in their major.
 
D.  Application to the History Department’s Graduate Program is done on-line through the    Graduate College website at https://gradcollege.okstate.edu/apply.  The following documents are required for the application process:
 
1. Official transcripts from previous schools attended.
 
2. Scores for the verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing sections of the Graduate Record Examination.
 
3. Three letters of recommendation.  Applicants are responsible for requesting letters of recommendation from individuals who are familiar with their academic work and can assess the applicant’s likeliness to succeed in the History Graduate Program.  References should comment on the applicant’s aptitude for teaching if application is being made for a teaching assistantship.
 
4. Statement of Intent.  This is a statement outlining the goals students expect to reach within the graduate program, their specific fields of interest, and career goals.
 
       5.  Writing Sample.  Students should submit a research paper from a previous class.
 
II. PLAN OPTIONS
 
The Department of History offers two plans leading to the Master of Arts degree.  Each requires at least thirty hours of graduate level course work, including a grade of B or better in Historical Methods (HIST 5023), and a thesis.
 
A.  PLAN I
 
1.  Students must complete a minimum of thirty hours of graduate courses in two of the following fields:  United States, Europe, or World (may include Africa, Ancient World, Asia, Latin America, and/or Middle East).  These hours must include at least twelve hours of seminar including at least one research seminar, Historical Methods (HIST 5023), and six hours of thesis (HIST 5000).  Students may take one seminar outside of the department in a related discipline with the consent of their advisory committee.  Students will take at least twelve hours in the major field and at least nine in a minor field.  Students may have no more than six hours at the graduate level in a related discipline, or in History 6100 or History 6130 courses.  The Graduate Studies Committee may approve exceptions under extraordinary circumstances; appeals should be made to the Director of Graduate Studies.  
 
2.  Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of a foreign language.  The foreign language requirement may be met by:
 
a. passing the foreign language exam administered by the Director of Graduate Studies.  For information about the cost, scheduling, and procedures, see “Policies and Procedures for the Foreign Language Examination” in this Handbook (page 32).
 
b. completing fifteen college-level credits or more in a single foreign language with an overall B average.
 
c.  completing and earning a grade of B or higher in a language-immersion course approved  by the Graduate Studies Committee.  Advisory committees may require additional proficiency in other languages, quantitative methods, or other research skills.  Students are urged to complete their language requirement(s) by the end of their second semester of enrollment.  If students opt to take the foreign language examination to fulfill this requirement, they must take the examination by the second semester of enrollment and in each semester thereafter until the exam is passed.  Teaching Assistants, who are required to demonstrate foreign language competency, must demonstrate progress toward fulfilling the foreign language requirement no later than their second semester of enrollment.  See “Requirements and Duties of Teaching Assistants and Associates” on pages 36-37 of this Handbook.    
 
3.  Students must maintain a B (3.0) average as defined in the university regulations in the Graduate Catalog.
 
4.  Students must demonstrate a capacity for independent research by preparing an original thesis on a topic within their major area of study.  Before research begins, students should consult with their advisor to determine if their research requires the approval of the Institutional Review Board (IRB).  If it does, students should secure IRB approval and take the appropriate training.
 
a. The student’s advisory committee has the responsibility for approving the topic, for supervising the research and writing of the thesis, and for approving the final copy.  Normally, a thesis will be approximately one hundred pages in length, including historiography, notes, and bibliography.
 
b.  The thesis should be prepared according to the Graduate College Thesis Guidelines. Master’s students are required to meet the thesis format review deadline by either attending a thesis format workshop or viewing the on-line version of the workshop by the deadline specified in the Graduate College academic calendar for the semester they intend to graduate. Completion of the workshop requirement at least one semester before they intend to graduate is recommended. 
 
     c.  The Graduate College requires completion of the final examination (oral defense of the thesis) about four weeks before the end of the semester.  With the Advisory Committee Chair’s and/or Thesis Advisor’s approval, paper or electronic copies (as preferred by each Advisory Committee member) of the thesis draft should be provided to all Advisory Committee members at least two full weeks prior to the scheduled defense. Holidays and breaks when the University is closed should not be counted in this two-week minimum requirement.
 
5. Upon completion of the thesis, students must pass a final oral examination of approximately two hours in length in defense of their thesis.  Chaired by the advisor, the orals committee will be composed of the student’s Advisory Committee.  Following the examination, the members of the committee will vote to pass or fail the candidate. Passing the final examination requires a simple majority of the committee members.  The student may take the examination again but not less than one month later. The examination may not be taken more than twice.  University regulations specify that the oral defense shall be open to all members of the Graduate Faculty.  With the consent of the student’s Advisory Committee, others may also attend.
 
B.  PLAN II:  PUBLIC HISTORY 
 
1. Students must complete a minimum of thirty-six hours of graduate courses in two fields of study -- the major field being in Public History.  These hours must include at least nine hours of seminar (reading and/or research; at least one should be a research seminar), Historical Methods (HIST 5023), Introduction to Public History (HIST 5033), an internship (HIST 5030), and six hours of thesis (HIST 5000).  Normally, students will also take Museum Studies (HIST 5053) and/or Historic Preservation (HIST 5063).  With the approval of the student’s Advisory Committee, as many as nine of these hours may be taken in related disciplines.  Students may include no more than six hours in History 6100 courses and six hours in History 6130 courses.  The Graduate Studies Committee may approve exceptions under extraordinary circumstances; appeals should be made to the Director of Graduate Studies.  The foreign language requirement outlined in Plan I is optional, but a student’s Advisory Committee may require a reading knowledge of a foreign language for certain topics.
 
2. The internship (worth six hours of credit) is intended to provide practical experience working in some field of Public History.  Normally, this will require at least eight weeks of full-time work or the equivalent.  The internship requires the submission of a paper describing the student’s activities undertaken to fulfill this requirement.
 
3. Students must demonstrate a capacity for independent research by preparing an original thesis on a topic within their major area of study.  Before research begins, students should consult with their advisor to determine if their research requires the approval of the Institutional Review Board (IRB).  If it does, students should secure IRB approval and take the appropriate training.
 
a. The student’s advisory committee has the responsibility for approving the topic, for 
supervising the research and writing of the thesis, and for approving the final copy. Normally
a thesis is approximately one hundred pages, including historiography, notes, and
bibliography.
 
b. The thesis should be prepared according to the Graduate College Thesis Guidelines. Master’s students are required to meet the thesis format review deadline by either attending a thesis format workshop or viewing the on-line version of the workshop by the deadline specified in the Graduate College academic calendar for the semester they intend to graduate. Completion of the workshop requirement at least one semester before they intend to graduate is recommended.
 
c. The Graduate College requires completion of the final examination (oral defense of the thesis) about four weeks before the end of the semester.  With the Advisory Committee Chair’s and/or Research Advisor’s approval, paper or electronic copies (as preferred by each Advisory Committee member) of the thesis draft should be provided to all Advisory Committee members at least two full weeks prior to the scheduled defense. Holidays and breaks when the University is closed should not be counted in this two-week minimum requirement.
 
     4. Upon completion of the thesis, students must pass a final oral examination of approximately       
          two hours in length in defense of their thesis.  Chaired by the advisor, the orals committee will    
be composed of the student’s Advisory Committee.  Following the examination, the members of the committee will vote to pass or fail the candidate.  Passing the final examination requires a simple majority of the committee members.  The student may take the examination again but not less than one month later.  The examination may not be taken more than twice.  University regulations specify that the oral defense shall be open to all members of the Graduate Faculty.  With the consent of the student’s Advisory Committee, others may also attend.
 
III. ADVISORY COMMITTEE
 
A.  Students must request appointment of an Advisory Committee prior to enrolling in their second full semester beyond the B.A. degree.
 
B.  Upon the recommendation of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies, an Advisory Committee of no fewer than three voting members will be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate College.  This committee consists of members of the OSU Graduate Faculty (at least one from each field), including the student’s advisor, who acts as chairperson and must have Graduate Faculty status.  The chair must hold an OSU faculty appointment, normally a tenured or tenure-track appointment in the History Department.  The chair’s duties include convening meetings of the Advisory Committee as appropriate; ensuring compliance with policies, procedures, and requirements; overseeing the Plan of Study and thesis submission processes; and ensuring that the research topic undertaken is appropriate to satisfy degree requirements.  The duties of other members of the student’s Advisory Committee include giving direction to the student’s preparation of a Plan of Study; attending meetings of the Advisory Committee; reviewing drafts of the M.A. thesis; and consulting regularly with other committee members and the student to monitor progress toward the degree.  With the consent of the advisor, students may substitute a representative from another appropriate discipline for one member.
 
C.  The Plan of Study must be approved by the Advisory Committee and filed with the Graduate College prior to enrollment for the twelfth graduate credit hour.
 
IV.  TRANSFER HOURS
 
     At the discretion of the student’s Advisory Committee, up to nine hours of coursework with a grade of B or better can be transferred from another graduate program or taken as a non-degree graduate student at OSU.
 
V. MAINTAINING STANDING IN THE PROGRAM
 
A.  INCOMPLETES
 
Incompletes must be cleared within one year.  The Graduate Studies Committee will review the status of graduate students with more than nine hours of incomplete.
 
B.  COMPLETION OF PRIOR DEGREE
 
     Any person admitted to the graduate program who has not received his or her undergraduate degree will be allowed one semester to complete the prior degree.  Those who fail to complete the prior degree within one semester after beginning the M.A. program will not be permitted to continue.  Those removed from the program may reapply for admission with evidence of the prior degree.  They may be considered for available aid and assistantships at the time of readmission along with other regular applicants.
 
C.  TEACHING ASSISTANTS
 
      Academic requirements for retaining an appointment as a Teaching Assistant are stricter than those for maintaining standing in the M.A. program; for these requirements, see the document entitled “Teaching Assistants and Associates” in this Handbook on pages 36-37. Teaching Assistants must demonstrate progress toward fulfilling the foreign language requirement no later than their second semester of enrollment.
 
D.  ANNUAL REVIEW OF GRADUATE STUDENTS
 
     All graduate students are subject to an annual review of their progress conducted by the Graduate Studies Committee.  If deficiencies are found, the student’s Advisory Committee will be notified. Failure to rectify deficiencies may lead to dismissal from the program.
 
 

Internships

Finding an Internship

An internship is a great way to develop skills and experience that will transfer to the workplace after college. You can typically earn upper-division History course credit for internships through HIST 4990. (Another option is our Jobs In History course, which gives you practicum experience, along with an in-class portion. See Undergraduate Advisor for more details). 

The first step is contacting a relevant institution, locally or nationally, that either already has available internships listed on its website, or that might be open to hosting a student who wants to work for course credit. A list of potential sites is posted at the bottom of this page. 

Requirements

  • The student must identify a suitable internship location, in consultation with a relevant Academic Supervisor.
  • 50 hours of work per credit hour, to be completed over the course of a semester, for a maximum of six credit hours. Except in exceptional cases approved by Academic and Site Supervisors, the student is expected to work some hours each week of the semester.
  • Contract, signed by Student, Academic and Site Supervisor, specifying the nature and responsibilities of the internship
  • Daily journal specifying tasks of the day, as well as reflections on how it helps prepare for a career, or how it utilizes existing historical or other academic skills (in other words, how did your education prepare you for this?). The student will turn in the daily journal to the Academic Supervisor at least twice per term: once at the time of the midterm evaluation and again at the end of the term.
  • Student must turn in a midterm evaluation form and 2-3 page (double spaced) reflection on how this experience prepares you for a job, how it ties in with the study of history, and what you hope to accomplish in the rest of the semester. It can summarize some of the points made in the journal. The Site Supervisor must also complete midterm and final evaluations, including a form and a written statement as to how the student is performing.
  • Final essay, 6-7 pages for three credit hours, or 9-10 pages for 6 credit hours, due at exam time, including an extended reflection, similar to the midterm reflection paper on how the internship prepares you for a career; how it relates to history; how your education prepared you for success in performing your tasks; strengths and weaknesses of the placement; recommendations for future students doing the internship; list of work accomplished during the internship. Academic Advisors may modify the requirements of the essay.
  • Up to one-page summary of the internship to go on the website, including 1-2 photos, reviewed and approved by the Site Supervisor.
  • Copies or illustrations of work accomplished during the internship. On completion of the internship, during exam time of the semester of the internship, the student should assemble these materials into a final Portfolio. An electronic copy of the website information must be sent to the Academic Supervisor.

Objectives/Evaluation

Students will be evaluated based on their ability to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to apply training to a work setting through the use of relevant skills.
  • Demonstrate professional standards, including punctuality, attention to detail, ability to work independently, courtesy and collegiality, timely compliance with requirements of the internship (above), etc.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of career options that the internship provides.
  • Demonstrate an application of the skills to the field of History.

Responsibilities of the Academic Supervisor

  • Consult with the student about internship opportunities.
  • Provide deadlines, explain requirements, and ensure the receipt of appropriate signatures.
  • Contact the Site supervisor before the contract is signed, and at least once during the internship.
  • Assign a grade.
  • Ensure that relevant information gets posted on the website.


Internship Forms (PDF links)

Internship Contract
Student Evaluation of Internship
Employer Evaluation of Intern

Potential sites

Local:
Sheerar Museum of Stillwater History
National Wrestling Hall of Fame
Archives/Special Collections
Oklahoma Oral History Research Program
OSU Museum of Art 

State: 
Oklahoma History Center
List of 30 State Museums and Historic Sites
Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum
Oklahoma Museums Association

National:
Smithsonian Institution
National History Day

National Museum of American History
National Archives
National History Center
The Breakthrough Institute
The Student Conservation Association

 

Doctor of Philosophy Program

 
I.  ADMISSION
 
A. In addition to fulfillment of the general requirements of the Graduate College, admission to doctoral study in history shall be based upon the recommendation of the Graduate Studies Committee to the Head of the department.
 
B. The preferred background for admission is an M.A. degree in history with a thesis.  The Graduate Studies Committee will consider other applications on an individual basis.  Students with insufficient hours in history may be required by the Graduate Studies Committee to take additional hours at the 5000/6000 level.  Students should already have made progress toward proficiency in a foreign language before seeking admission.
 
C. The Graduate Studies Committee will give preference to applicants with an overall grade point average of 3.5 or above in their M.A. program.
 
D.      Application to the History Department’s Graduate Program is done on-line through the Graduate College website at https://gradcollege.okstate.edu/apply.  The following documents are required for the application process:
 
1. Official transcripts from previous schools attended.
 
2. Scores for the verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing sections of the Graduate Record Examination.
 
3. Three letters of recommendation.  Applicants are responsible for requesting letters of recommendation from individuals who are familiar with their academic work and can assess the applicant’s likeliness to succeed in the History Graduate Program.  References should comment on the applicant’s aptitude for teaching if application is being made for a teaching associateship.
 
4. Statement of Intent.  This is a statement outlining the goals students expect to reach within the graduate program, their specific fields of interest, and career goals.
 
   5.   Writing Sample.  Students who have written an M.A. thesis should submit one chapter from the thesis as a writing sample.  Otherwise, students should submit a research paper from a previous class.
 
II. FIELD OF STUDY
 
The Ph.D. program requires at least sixty hours beyond the M.A. degree.  Students must, in consultation with their Advisory Committee, select three fields of study – a general field (at least fifteen hours), a major field (at least twelve hours), and a minor field (at least nine hours), from the options shown below.  Geographical diversity among the fields is strongly encouraged.  To be admitted to candidacy, students must pass comprehensive examinations, demonstrate a reading knowledge of one foreign language, have an approved dissertation proposal, and submit a Plan of Study to the Graduate College before writing a dissertation.  All Ph.D. students must take Historiography (HIST 6023), Teaching History at the College Level (HIST 5021), and at least eighteen hours of seminar, including at least three hours of research seminar.  Students without an M.A. thesis must take Historical Methods (HIST 5023).  With the consent of their Advisory Committee, students may apply graduate course work taken outside the History Department to their major field.
 
General Fields:
 
United States
Europe to 1789
Europe since 1789
 
Major Fields (including but not limited to):
 
United States West
Native North America
Medicine, Environment, and Food
Religion
Gender
War and Society
Race and Ethnicity
 
Minor Fields:
 
North America
Europe
Ancient World
Middle East
Asia
Latin America
Public History
 
III. ADVISORY COMMITTEE:  APPOINTMENT AND ROLE
 
A.  Students must request appointment of an Advisory Committee before the end of their second semester beyond the M.A. degree.
 
B.   Upon the recommendation of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies, a Ph.D. Advisory Committee of no fewer than four voting members will be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate College.  This committee consists of members of the OSU Graduate Faculty (at least one from each of the examination fields and one from outside the History Department), including the student’s advisor, who acts as chairperson and must have Graduate Faculty status.  The chair must hold an OSU faculty appointment, normally a tenured or tenure-track appointment in the History Department.  The chair’s duties include convening meetings of the Advisory Committee as appropriate; ensuring compliance with policies, procedures, and requirements; coordinating preparation and evaluation of comprehensive examinations; overseeing the Plan of Study and dissertation submission processes; and ensuring that the research topic undertaken is appropriate to satisfy degree requirements.  Normally, the chair of the student’s Advisory Committee will serve as the dissertation advisor.  The duties of other members of the student’s Advisory Committee include giving direction to the student’s preparation for comprehensive examinations; participating in preparing and evaluating comprehensive examinations in accord with Graduate College and departmental program requirements; attending meetings of the Advisory Committee; reviewing draft documents of the dissertation; and consulting regularly with other committee members and the student to monitor progress toward the degree.  The outside member, who must be a member of the OSU Graduate Faculty, serves as the representative of the Graduate College and ensures that appropriate academic standards and a high level of integrity are maintained in the processes used to review and evaluate the student.
 
C.  The Plan of Study must be approved by the student’s Advisory Committee and filed with the Graduate College before the end of their second semester beyond the M.A. degree.
 
IV. COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND PREPARATION FOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
 
A.   A minimum of sixty semester graduate credit hours beyond the M.A. degree is required, with a “B” average for all courses.  Students must take at least eighteen hours of seminar including at least three hours of research seminar.  Course work to be completed will be indicated on a Plan of Study.  Students may include no more than six hours in History 6100 courses and six hours in History 6130 courses.  The Graduate Studies Committee may approve exceptions under extraordinary circumstances; appeals should be made to the Director of Graduate Studies.  Those students with a minor field in Public History are expected to complete an internship.
 
B.   Students who plan to take comprehensive examinations must have an updated Plan of Study on file and must have completed all courses required by the Plan, except for dissertation hours.  They must also have met the foreign language requirement.  In preparing for comprehensive examinations, students must not only complete and review all course work but also read extensively in their examination fields.  It is recommended that students consult with members of their advisory committee in identifying major works in their fields of study.
 
 V.       TRANSFER HOURS
 
       At the discretion of the student’s Advisory Committee, up to nine hours of coursework with a grade of B or better can be transferred from another graduate program or taken as a non-degree graduate student at OSU.
 
VI.       MAINTAINING STANDING IN THE PROGRAM
 
A.   INCOMPLETES
 
      Incompletes must be cleared within one year.  The Graduate Studies Committee will review the status of graduate students with more than nine hours of incomplete.
 
B.   COMPLETION OF PRIOR DEGREE
 
Any person admitted to the graduate program who has not received his or her M.A. will be allowed one semester to complete the prior degree.  Those who fail to complete the prior degree within one semester after beginning the Ph.D. program will not be permitted to continue.  Those removed from the program may reapply for admission with evidence of the prior degree.  They may be considered for available financial aid and teaching associateships at the time of readmission along with other regular applicants.
 
C.  TEACHING ASSOCIATES
 
      .Academic requirements for retaining an appointment as a Teaching Associate are stricter than those for maintaining standing in the Ph.D. program; for these requirements, see the document entitled “Teaching Assistants and Associates” in this Handbook on pages 36-37.  For example, Teaching Associates are required to take the foreign language examination in the second semester of enrollment and in each semester thereafter until the exam is passed.
 
D.  ANNUAL REVIEW OF GRADUATE STUDENTS
 
     All graduate students are subject to an annual review of their progress conducted by the Graduate Studies Committee.  If deficiencies are found, the student’s Advisory Committee will be notified.   Failure to rectify deficiencies may lead to dismissal from the program.
 
VII. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
 
A.  Students must take comprehensive examinations in three fields.  The foreign language 
            requirement must be met before students take comprehensive examinations.
 
B.  Passing the Ph.D. comprehensive examinations depends upon the student’s successful performance on both the written and oral portions of the examination weighted equally.  Students must pass the written portion of a field examination to advance to the orals in that field.  Students must pass all three field examinations to satisfy the Ph.D. requirements.
 
C.   Students who fail one of the written field exams and pass the other two, may proceed to the oral stage of the exam in those two fields.  Students deficient in a single field must retake that field examination the following semester.   Students who fail two of the three written field examinations will not take oral exams in any of the fields and must retake all three exams the following semester.  Students may not take comprehensive examinations more than twice.
 
D.  Students must pass comprehensive examinations and be admitted to candidacy at least six months prior to graduation.
 
Written Comprehensive Examinations for the Ph.D. Degree
      A.  Written comprehensive examinations are offered once during each semester of the regular school year.
 
1.  Students eligible and desiring to take these examinations must notify their advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies of their intention by the date announced at the beginning of the semester.
 
   2.  The student’s Advisory Committee serves as the examining committee, with one representative from each of the three fields.  The advisor is responsible for soliciting questions from representatives of the two other fields and coordinating the preparation and evaluation of the written examination.  The examining committee will collectively approve the content of the examination.
 
      3. The Graduate Studies Committee will prescribe procedural rules for administering the examinations.  The Director of Graduate Studies will determine the date, time, and place for each examination, but no student may take two examinations on the same day.  Each written examination will be six hours in length.
 
B.   Normally, no more than fourteen days after completion of each written field examination, the Advisory Committee will provide the student a written report evaluating the student’s performance on each field exam.
 
Oral Comprehensive Examinations for the Ph.D. Degree
 
A.   Normally, oral exams will be held no more than thirty days after completion of the last written examination.
 
B.  Each committee member is expected to be present (or available via a suitable Internet platform or a conference call) for the entire oral examination.  Members should not schedule the oral examination at a time when other commitments prevent their being present for the entire examination.
 
C.  During the oral examination, every member of the Advisory Committee will question the student.  The Advisory Committee chair will be responsible for determining the sequence of questioning by other members of the committee, allotting each member sufficient time to evaluate the student’s overall performance, and providing an opportunity for questions by other faculty members in attendance.
 
Evaluation
 
A.  To pass a field exam, a student must pass both the written and oral components.  That determination will be made by a majority vote of the members of the Advisory Committee after completion of the oral examination.
 
B.   No member of the Advisory Committee should sign the approval form until after the entire examination is completed and all members of the committee have discussed the student’s overall performance.
 
C.  The advisor is responsible for reporting the results of the examination to the Director of Graduate Studies.
 
VIII.   ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY
 
Students are admitted to the status of candidacy when they have met the following requirements:
 
A.  Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of a foreign language.  The foreign language requirement may be met by:
 
1. passing the foreign language exam administered by the Director of Graduate Studies.  For information about the cost, scheduling, and procedures, see “Policies and Procedures for the Foreign Language Examination” in this Handbook on page 32.
 
2. completing fifteen college-level credits or more in a single foreign language with an overall B average or higher.
 
3. completing and earning a grade of B or higher in a language-immersion course approved by the Graduate Studies Committee.
 
Advisory committees may require additional proficiency in other languages, quantitative methods, or other research skills.  Students are urged to complete their language requirement(s) by the end of their second semester of enrollment.  Teaching Associates must demonstrate progress toward fulfilling the foreign language requirement no later than their second semester of enrollment (see “Requirements and Duties of Teaching Assistants and Associates” on pages 36-37 of this Handbook).
 
B.   Passed comprehensive examinations.
 
C.   Received the approval of the student’s advisory committee for a dissertation proposal, in the form designated by the department, and filed it with the Director of Graduate Studies by the end of the semester after the student passes comprehensive examinations.
 
IX. DISSERTATION
 
A. Candidates must demonstrate a capacity for independent research by the production of an original dissertation on a topic within their major field of study.  The advisor and the candidate’s Advisory Committee have the responsibility for supervising the research and writing of the dissertation and for approving the final copy.  Normally, dissertations will be in excess of two hundred pages, including historiography, notes, and bibliography.
 
B. The Graduate College requires completion of the final examination (oral defense of the dissertation) about four weeks before the end of the semester.  Candidates must complete the dissertation sufficiently in advance of that deadline to permit careful review of the manuscript by all members of the student’s Advisory Committee.
 
 X. ORAL DEFENSE
 
Upon completion of the dissertation, candidates must pass a final oral examination of approximately two hours in length in defense of their dissertation.  Chaired by the advisor, the orals committee will be composed of the student’s Advisory Committee.  Following the examination, the members of the committee will vote to pass or fail the candidate. Passing the final examination requires a simple majority of the committee members.  The student may take the examination again at least one month later. The examination may not be taken more than twice.  University regulations specify that the oral defense shall be open to all members of the Graduate Faculty.  With the consent of the Advisory Committee, others may also attend.
 

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